OMNI-TV File: The 2 Facets of Bangladesh’s garment workers’ tragedy; Slow Food movement and the importance of buying local produce

Zuhair Kashmer on OMNI TV commentary logo

Bangladesh factory deaths — two facets of colonialism (april 4, 2013)

There are two facets to the tragedy near Dhaka in Bangladesh caused by the ravages of a world dominated by perverse capitalist thinking that feeds cheap goods to the west on the backs of cheap labour in the east – first the human tragedy — hundreds of workers trapped as they manufactured clothing for the likes of Loblaw’s Joe Fresh — at the time of writing 400 had perished but there was no count of how many remained trapped, presumed dead, in the collapse of a factory which would not even pass the test for a garden shed in Canada — but this tragedy is not new to Bangladesh — since 2005, more than 700 workers have died in accidents – and these are official figures — look elsewhere in South Asia, and tragedies are happening every day — millions of children not attending school in India and Pakistan because their nimble little fingers are better in hazardous mines that will probably give them cancer or lead poisoning or weaving carpets — the second facet of this tragedy is woven in Bangladesh’s history — the story of the finest muslin cotton every woven – what was known as Dhakay ka malmal – so fine that three yards of it that Indian women wear as a sari could be fed through your wedding ring — this centuries old industry was destroyed by the British who had workshops burned down and hands crushed of weavers that wouldn’t stop — all in order to open up the market for cheap cotton woven in the substandard industrial mills of Birmingham — today the shoe is on the other foot — think about it, I’m Zuhair Kashmeri.

Slow Food = local produce and sustainable communities (March 27, 2013)

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If you like me believe that the enjoyment of food is becoming a dying experience, then it is time for you to take a look at the Slow Food movement started by Carlo Petrini in Italy, which puts back the pleasure into eating – Slow Food is the opposite of what we are blasted with on TV – Fast Food – mass produced for mass consumption – Slow Food says buy produce grown within 100 kilometres of your home – and believe me you will find plenty of farm outlets in that radius – you will be surprised at how much is grown domestically – All of Canada’s provinces promote local produce – Ontario has a website for Food Ontario that lists all the fresh fruits and vegetables and the months they are available – in Niagara Region where I live, I buy locally grown water melon for five dollars – not the genetically modified seedless one but the old fashioned one with black seeds whose sweetness takes me back to my days in India – Alberta has a site promoting locally grown foods that lists ten reasons why you should you buy local – that go beyond taste and nutrition – for one thing, pollution – do you how many tractor trailers ply the highways between Florida, California and Canada? – bringing us produce even out of season and with it air pollution and global warming – Alberta scientists says nutrition in food dissipates quickly so that by the time you eat veggies grown in Chile, their nutrition has diminished – buy local, support local farm families, taste the real taste and not the artificially freshened supermarket produce and keep your community intact for your children – think about it, I’m Zuhair Kashmeri.

Slow Food (spare)

If you like me believe that the enjoyment of food is becoming a dying experience, then it is time for you to take a look at the Slow Food movement started by Carlo Petrini in Italy, which puts back the pleasure into eating Slow Food is the opposite of what we are blasted with on TV Fast Food mass produced for mass consumption Slow Food says buy produce grown within 100 kilometres of  your home and believe me you will find plenty of farm outlets in that radius you will be surprised at how much is grown domestically – All of Canada’s provinces promote local produce – Ontario has a website for Food Ontario that lists all the fresh fruits and vegetables and the months they are available in Niagara Region where I live, I buy locally grown water melon for five dollars not the genetically modified seedless one but the old fashioned one with black seeds whose sweetness takes me back to my days in India Alberta has a site promoting locally grown foods that lists ten reasons why you should you buy local that go beyond taste and nutrition for one thing, pollution do you how many tractor trailers ply the highways between Florida, California and Canada? bringing us produce even out of season and with it air pollution and global warming Alberta scientists says nutrition in food dissipates quickly so that by the time you eat veggies grown in Chile, their nutrition has diminished buy local, support local farm families, taste the real taste and not the artificially freshened supermarket produce and keep your community intact for your children think about it, I’m Zuhair Kashmeri.

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